Skip to main content

About your Search

20130110
20130110
SHOW
Today 7
( more )
STATION
SFGTV2 26
SFGTV 22
MSNBC 13
MSNBCW 13
WBAL (NBC) 11
CNN 9
CNNW 9
FBC 9
WRC (NBC) 9
CSPAN 7
CSPAN2 7
WTTG 7
KPIX (CBS) 6
WJZ (CBS) 6
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 221
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 224 (some duplicates have been removed)
would like to present two certificates to you. on behalf of the board of education and the san francisco unified school district. [applause] >> i talked to ester this morning, and i promise i will not take too long. but i will first share my time with two of my outstanding staff members. mrs. jeanna chow and mr. taylor. >> hi, i am jena chou, and i am a kindergarten teacher. i would like to share a few quick reflections. i remember when alice fong yu didn't have enough student and we had to sell the program. and now we don't have to sell the program, in fact we are all sold out. i remember when students went to chinatown to practice the skills and the culture. and now students travel to china to speak the language and live the culture. and none of this it would be without liana szeto. i remember her tireless way to be sure of this success. and determined and still has tireless energy and still have the vision. only now she needs to see it in a slightly larger font. i am -- [laughter] i was going to take that out, but my staff said to keep it in. i am so honored to be a part of alice fong
? they can barely speak english, she said. with 12 words, a colleague, a fellow professional educator defined my professional path. when i recalled this dismissal in those two sentences, i am reminded of the thing that (inaudible) in the intervening years. however these 12 words are not only enough to express the challenges that my team and i have faced, but they stand for our triumphs as well. despite a skeptical and hostile environment, we survived. starting in the 80s with just 25 students started as the first chinese public school opened in san francisco in 1985. as i remember, i remember the quote, which would you teach chinese to them? i try to recall that and to what my colleague said has grown from a small pocket of multi-ethnic students to a student body comprised of many diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. i try to recall how hard we fought, administrator and parents and students and teachers alike. and what we each sacrificed to be be where -- to be where we are today. today i am humbled by my students who excel in two languages and our students are asked to demonstrate their chine
of education presented basically has the definition of bullying in every single state and also a list of i think 37 components and ranks that show you state by state which ones include those components of it. as we heard earlier the federal department is close to approving a federal definition of bullying, so i do believe there is a lot of work in this area. i also think there is a lot of work going on in terms of evidence based practices in terms of interventions that is very exciting. some of the information that we know is that about 80% of the bullying that goes on can pretty much be handled by some very prescribed ways of dealing with things. 20% requires really very targeted social emotional behavioral approach and i think that as we get better at that knowing what methods work with which kids we're going to come a long ways in terms of the interventions and then being successful with those. >> thank you. >> a lot of folks talked about the culture of a school and improving the culture of a school. when i was doing background research on bullying one thing that came to mind was so
year from elsewhere to kick their education here and who may want to stay here and have jobs here, we should make that easier for them. it is a big debate around a lot of issues. we look forward to working with the administration and congress on that. >> the states have had different reactions to health care reform. some are in the process of forming their own insurance exchanges. other states are leaving it up to the federal government. he proudly each have different perspectives on it. is health reform going to work in 2014 given the responses on the state level to it? >> i know we each address it. i will start. devastates are taking a different approach. one has to do -- different states are taking a different approach. in delaware, we decided to to a state federal partnership after a significant concentration -- consultation. number two, the issue was do we expand medicaid. this was an issue of math. we believe it is a good lesson for us to make sure more people covered through this expansion while at the same time, the federal reimbursement for medicaid increases. number three, t
, commissioner wynn. >> i wanted to point out that the board, the rules committee and the board of education it remains in the process of re-examining all of our policies. on which the rules of board is one section. that's why the format looks change. and not throughout here, and we are still in the process of doing that, and just to reiterate there are sections that we assigned to various committees not the rules committee. and the grounds commission and the curriculum section to the curriculum committee, etc.. and we hope to complete that this year. >> thank you, any other comments from the board? roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> mendoza. >> yes. dr. murase. >> aye. >> norton. >> aye. >> wynns. >> seven ayes. >> now we proceed to the annual election of officers for the board of education. as a reminder to the board and public, this election is by voice vote. and we do not need a second, and it's permisable for a member to vote for themselves. good to know. board members you will vote by name. if only one nomination, or more than you vote by
for start-ups. staffing, exactly. so we have that as part of this innovation center. >> access to education and access to the right environment. >> yes, i would say so. >> ibm is a big company. i am sure there are a lot of people in the valley that still see it as an east coast-based company. the reality is you have been here for a long time. can you talk about the ontario culture here and what is being done that with the great ideas -- a entrepreneurial culture here and what is being done with the great ideas? >> we started here in 1962. this building is about 25 years old. we were down the hill at the san jose raiders center. -- research center. one of the things that ibm does -- a couple of things. one is having an eye on where things are going. one of the reasons that we focused here on data, relational database disk drive, was, looking at the time, the inability to access data quickly on a computer was actually an inhibitor to getting business done. one of the ways that you get innovation out there is you understand how it is going to be used, really, before you start. the major reason
for children" and we have been around for about 32 years. we're nonprofit and we do both education and advocacy and on the education end we develop be curriculum and the curriculum is used widely across the country. it's in every state in the country and in canada and 70 countries around the world and programs we're familiar with is second step and i am hearing some nods and we have a -- idea of kind of what kind of things that we do, and i also do advocacy work so i come and speak at meetings like this. i was at the attorney general's meeting in washington state and i would like to congratulate you and especially those in law enforcement in california for the high level of discourse that you have incredibly impressed today by what i have heard and my hats off to you for all the good work you're doing. so i do advocacy and part of that is kind of reaching out to people and bringing the message of social emotional learning not just to schools because educators kind of get it. it's not a stretch when we talk to them why it's important to get it, but we want to take the message out
board does, sharing high quality courses that are designed and built upon and refined through educators working together. >> i want to separate these four second. i could not agree with you more that brilliant minds helped shape a common core. as opposed to the construction -- >> it was a combination of mathematicians and educators. if you're making turf courses -- >> we have teacher preparation programs across the country. many of them not the kinds of institutions for which people are recruited. we're trying to get these programs to overhaul what they do. i understand the value of trying to share practices. i am curious. are there other ways to help change what is going on? >> let me pause and celebrate your candor in the following sense. this is the time in a time of limited resources to step out. when people ask what more resources to need to implement it worries me as a question in the sense that we have to learn how to redirect and be more efficient and to get an edge of the few things these standards are asking us to do. i am saying you're right. as a system, producing productive
. >> maryland achieves and knee- jerk achievement. education week magazine has named the school -- a major achievement. education week magazine has been the school the best and the nation for the fifth year in a row. >> maryland hangs on to its no. 1 ranking. >> obviously we are delighted maryland has identified as number one by quality council. >> she is in charge of what students are learning across the state, but she says there is enough credit to go around. >> it gives the opportunity to recognize stakeholders across the state to have really worked together to make this the number one school system. >> as you look at this year's results, would you say there is room for improvement? >> the work is not done. certainly the focus on on eliminating the achievement gap. every parent, every educator, every child deserves to have the very best school in his or her community. >> maryland received nothing more than a b grade in a number of academic categories. it landed an a in several categories including work force policies. >> how tough is it to remain no. one year after year? >> we want to m
agreement, both will be held on january 22, 2013. discussion of other educational, issues none. and item n, none. item o, we will vote on the calendar for one item that was severed. roll call. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas. >> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> aye. >> item p, consent calendar resolutions, this our audit, 2-c, and our auditor is in the audience. >> i first want to congratulate president norton and vice president fewer, on your new titles. we have with us tonight leonard dana, to give you a short presentation on our 2011-12 audit. the company has done our audits for six or seven years now. and mr. dana has been a partner on this for three years now i think. >> i am on my second go around. >> exactly. >> usually when we present the audit reports, we usually have a lot to talk about. because of the findings. but i went back and looked at prior reports. and i didn't find one that didn't have one comment in them. and some comments if you go back in time, they are more than ticky-tack items, they were fairly serious items. and it sh
the world. we have to make sure our education system lifts them to their highest aspirations. when the society ages, it tends to -- it declines. that is the big demographic imperative. i was reviewing one of my favorite books on the roman republic. how did this village on the tiber grow to be the absolute leader of the known world in a few hundred years? it expanded its territory by plunder, by what ever. details. it was not pretty. [laughter] it added people, it kept getting bigger and incorporated the people and to roman citizenship. it became very consolidated, expanding group of energetic people. and they'll work. they were not just a bunch of talkers, they were doing. -- there were doers. -- they were doers. we have to consolidate on this. we have to find the common path that will enable us to make the investments and undergo the sacrifice that is required because it is not all ice cream and cake here. you have to curtail consumption. whether it is a business or household. in terms of -- the free sector. it is still the same game. looking out for the future, saving for tomorr
sense to most of us, you have it khaifrpb the social norms. we must educate. but we must go beyond thinking more rigor will get us better achievement. we have to remember a school is a community and in a xhuept, people look out for each other. they've got each other's back. how do we begin to promote that idea that we are in this thing together? we believe it's through, unfortunately but truly, self-interest. kids are driven developmentally by the desire to fit in, to belong, to be part of an affinity group. if we can capitalize on their desire to look out for their friends and give them some more tools and opportunities and support, they will begin to do what we need them to do to at least confront it in their own small cell of social influence and the compounding and leveraging of that begins to make change. so the question we have to ask ourselves, are we as adults willing it slow down enough to invite kids to sit down at the table with us and partner? do we have the courage to understand that inclusion takes time and we have have to work more diligently to i invite young pe
was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. as i said, our moderator is not always our lieutenant governor, of course he needs to introducti
this decline to a change in the way many hispanicr access to information, and higher education. is this a good thing or bad thing? >> i don't think it's something we need to get too alarmed about right now. there are many factors that contribute it to. one hispanics have highest unemployment rate between 110-13 rate where you have seen the decline. but also cultural thing. as more women get educated and more are in the workforce they are not having the eight kids that my grandmother had now women limit to two or three. a combination of the economy, plus the fact that they're getting a higher education has led to this. i wouldn't get alarmed we're growing at very fast rate. just last ten years we've doubled hispanic population by 2050 we're estimated to be at 12 million. i would say we're watching the situation but it's not an alarming rate yet. >> this is really very -- a very american thing if you think about it. >> notice when this decline stronger than we expected earlier than we expected, when it began, coincides almost exactly with the coming of the recession. and emigrants when they firs
to dozens of schools where there were dramatic gains that were maintained. >> "the education of michelle rhee." fr in ontlise made possie by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. and by the corporation for public broadcasting. major support for frontline is provided by the john d. and catherine t. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant and peaceful world. more information is available at macfound.org. additional funding is provided by the park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. and by the frontline journalism fund, supporting investigative reporting and enterprise journalism. additional funding for this program is provided by: >> michelle rhee's journey to national prominence began in 2007. washington dc had just inaugurated a new mayor, adrian fenty. he had won a landslide election and promised to fix the district's abysmal school system. >> the lack of real opportunity for young people drives our unemployment rate, it drives our crime rate, and we can't have that. this is the nation's
of education. congratulations new vice president fewer. don't mean to interrupt you while you are eating. and of course president norton, i believe president of the school board is the highest that anyone norton has risen since joshua crowned himself emperor. >> there is hope for me yet. >> we are talking about substitutes and like san francisco the sub -- substitutes are part of the union. they keep the classes going when teachers cannot be present. substitutes are the vice presidents for every teacher ready to step in and carry on if an emergency occurs. substitutes are the relief pitcher in the baseball of education. substitutes are the understudies to the teachers that star on stage. in california there are several categories of substitutes. we will talk about core substitutes and return to other substitute issues at future meetings. thank you very much. [applause] >> good evening, i am irvin. i am one of 15 core substitute teachers. we work at schools often covering the most difficult classrooms in the district. core substitutes are credentialed and certified. or average time in the
. >> education week magazine has named maryland the number 1 school system in the country for the fifth year in a row. >> maryland received a final overall grade of b-plus, the best in the nation. >> we are delighted that maryland has been identified as number one. >> judy is in charge about what students are learning across the state. she says there's enough credit to go around. >> stakeholders have worked together to make this the number 1 school system in the country for the fifth year in a row. >> would you say there's room for improvement? >> the work is not done. eliminating the achievement gap. every parent and educator and child deserves to have the best school in his or her community. >> maryland receives nothing more than a b grade in the categories. how tough is it to remain number 1? >> we're committed to making sure the children of maryland have the best education. can we say we will always be number one? of course not. >> tim tooten, wbal-tv 11 news. >> tim will have more tonight at 5:00 p.m. schools no longer in session for 1000 students in maryland. >> jennifer franciotti has
.s. attorney, representatives from the department of education confirm if we don't do anything about it, 13 million kids will become victims again for another year. some 3 million kids across the country will decide it is better to leave their school grounds than to continue their education. there will be more stupblting of the emotional and educational growth of our kids. all across the bay, whether working here in san francisco or alameda or sonoma or santa clara county. i want to thank you law enforcement officials here, instructors, community advocates, people who are concerned about our kids, they are our future and i would love to see a new generation of kids who don't know what bully is, who are not victims, who don't have those scars. but we've got to do today is sharing in the best practices, to be encouraged by programs like our roof top school here in san francisco who has traded a 50-person ambassador class that will talk about this, that will invite other kids, school administrators who have received the support of our school site administrators to encourage them to get this
. issues i care about, really care about. education has always been very center to the things i have been involved with. i am a former teacher also. i work in the early childhood education field for 18 years running an organization. those are parts of my dna. other things that people are not aware of, i do care about health environment in san francisco. i want to make sure that we have enough health facilities to serve all san francisco, not just one part of the city. i want to make sure that our small businesses are supported. why? i come from a family where we had a small grocery store. i understand what it means to run a small business. maybe people think about 500 people is a small business. i'm talking about businesses that drive neighborhoods, support neighborhoods, give jobs to people in those neighborhoods. i want to work with others on the board of supervisors to improve the conditions support them , and make them thrive. those are some of the things, education, the economy. now that we are through the downturn, and dealt with the cuts, we want to make sure that is we impr
an agreement with united educators for a two-year agreement. and both years have one-and-a-half of forced closure days. the half closure day is on the last day of school, noted on may 30. and then june 2 is the professional development day which also is a forced closure for our teachers. that's a furlough day. so we are pleased that in the school year is 179.5 days for the 13-14 year. and again those forced closure days may be revisited in the course based on the district and finances. >> okay. it's very timely as i got an e-mail today from someone asking me when the first day of school was in august. thank you for being so timely. >> thank you, madam president, this it will be the district website tomorrow. >> great, assuming we pass it. roll call please. >> ly. >> yes. >> wong. >> yes. >> fewer. >> yes. >> haney. >> yes. >> maufas,>> yes. >> murase. >> yes. >> wynns. >> yes. >> unanimous. >> thank you. next item is -- let's see, informational items. initial proposals. i announce the signing of the following two proposals. 2012-13 initial proposal for a successor collective bargaining ag
to quality education for all of its students. effectiveness of core substit e substitutes could be improved if their jobs were assigned no later than the night before. that was always practiced before previous years. currently jobs are assigned on the morning of the assignment. despite all reasonable efforts to reach the sights on time. it may be that we arrive late, this creates stress for the school staff and disrupts the student's learning routine. thank you. >> good evening commissioners. congratulations president norton and vice president fewer. and good evening superintendent. my name is darlene ania, and i am here today in my capacity as vice president of substitutes with uesf. i wish to direct attention to a problem that has impacted our students and schools for the entire fall semester. though initial steps have been taken to remedy this situation, i believe that this is an important issue which should be kind of spotlighted right now. so we don't have this same problem next year. the problem is an i.t. problem. the system was not inputting critical information on the sub-requests.
, the bully project, and we have been bringing the film and educating, training professional development largely thriewr our partnership with them and provides that to school districts and classrooms across the country for free, so educators can sign up, and if they agree to do the training and to take it seriously and embed it with the kids and the adults in the community we provide them with oftentimes busing, but often free tickets so they can see the film outside of school and make it an event and that is our project "1 million kids". we're doing it in a big way here in the bay area thanks to the leadership in this community. yep and oakland and all over. it's just awesome and in cleveland and right now we have 13,000 students across the basin in salt lake city are seeing it, and does have impact and the impact is largely i would say it creates a sense of agreement. the biggest thing that bully does or the big service the film has is gives everyone a unified collective science of agreement to which they roll up the sleeves and get busy creating change and has been really exciting
. it wanted a good education system. it is training so businesses can get the right workers. it is best known for its ski resorts and quality of life. the real challenge we have been working on in turning this thing around is to say, how do we become the most pro-business state? california will be more pro- business. oregon will be more pro- business. how to create that competition to be the most pro-business state but to hold ourselves to higher standards. we want to be the best of being pro-business. that focus, trying to get the partisanship to -- our legislators and state voters are one-third independent, republican and democrat and our legislature is almost evenly divided. if we pass our budget last week with 94 of 100 boats. i think we have been successful and beginning to get past the partisanship. this time to quit playing games and finding compromises. >> other specific things you were trying to do to make colorado more business friendly? >> we have efforts in every single agency of state government to cut specific regulations and red tape. we thought fracking was such a big deal. we
, that they will survive? i think we can all agree when we began our careers in education, we did it because children deserved better. to thrive and placed in situations to be successful. our jobs. mine, yours, are to remove those obstacles in front of them. and to do our best to give them that path to success. moving this will place a major obstacle in their way. these are students that have dealt with years of ada construction. and last year there was a fire and they were without a cafeteria and not to mention lost every book in the library. they have had to endure so much. and those who could help, and you are about to throw a huge obstacle in our way. i ask is this the best you can do? have you consulted with all parties? are you proud of the work you have done, and the decisions you are about to make? in my opinion unless you have received the answers that you are satisfied with, then you hand the work back to them and say, try again. [applause] >> good evening, i am melissa, the president of the board of creative arts charter school. i appreciate the opportunity to give comment. but really i wo
making the city work for everyone to make sure that we have the best public education system in the world. we have to make sure that we do that. we talked about diversity earlier. we talked about ethnic and racial diversity. but sexual orientation and gender identity also matter. we have a long history and tradition in san francisco of welcoming diversity when it comes to sexual orientation and gender identity. we have not gotten to the point where we can be completely satisfied that we are what we need to be. more than half -- almost half of all of the homeless youth in the city are lgbt youth; many are struggling for basic housing. we have many challenges but i am confident that we as a board, we as a city, can come together. i'm confident that we will really make sure that this is a city that works for everyone. and i want you to know - my colleagues and i remember the public not only those who are here those who are watching % that the supervisor is committed to doing everything i can so that san francisco lives up to the promise that i think is the promise
justice and people say "that's san francisco" and we believe that a right to a education is i social justice issue and if you deny that you're denying their civil rights. that's how we feel about being proactive. now there is a line of demarcation happens and we want to be proactive i know jill is looking at me. when the event happens and there is harm that occurs we believe in restorative practices and repairing the harm. we don't believe in kicks kids out of school. that's not a solution. we are an educational institution. we go through this process and the perpetrator understands the damage and make it right to the victim. it's not okay shake hands. it's a whole process. you talk about it and process what is happening and people follow up on that, so we very much believe in this restorative process in san francisco and how do we know? because of the indicators that should be going up are going up and the others are going down. our truancies are down. suspensions are down and students in class is going up. thank you for being here. [applause] >> okay. that's okay. you ju
important. so i thought i'd mention that. the other thing that we are moving towards in education is more digital. we'll see less textbooks and more digital learning and with that we are promoting a digital literacy policy which deals with a number of issues and i'm going to go back and look at the draft policy to see how well it deals with the kind of issues rob and your family have dealt with in terms of using the internet safely and being aware of the harm you can do to yourself and to others by the way digital news can get around. >> assemblyman. >> thank you very much. i'm very, very heartened. this was an issue that's been in the closet for too long. i think high profile nationally now as well and we have super stars involved, lady gaga, myself, but you got to reach young people. usually peers are the best, i think, in terms of communicating things and then absolutely the parents. let's keep working, i'm only as good as the information i have and so we want to do the most effective long-lasting legislation. you know what happens sometimes, something is written in law but the a
and killed. >> in tonight's education alert, for the fifth consecutive year, maryland ranked the no. 1 school system in the nation according to "education week" magazine. tim tooten has the story we first brought you today. this is getting to be old hat, isn't it? >> martineau mallee -- martin o'malley taking on critics of the school's success. >> we students show our appreciation by working hard. >> it was a celebration of the state's new ranking at the jones elementary school. that is when governor martin o'malley showed up to celebrate. >> as a result of our top choices, maryland public schools have been named for the fifth year in a row the number one public schools in america. maryland received an overall grade of b-plus. an a for transition and alignment, which tests college readiness and childhood education. a b for maths. among other grades, a b for k-12 achievement, which tracks all students perform on national tests. a b for standards, assessments, and accountability programs. >> it is just wonderful. is -- it is historic for our educators. >> maryland is among those celebrating the
advisory commission, comprised of experts in mental health, education, law enforcement, and first response. we may never know what motivated the events at sandy hook elementary, but that won't stop us from working to prevent future tragedy. over the coming months, the commission will come together to make specific, actionable recommendations in the areas of school safety, mental health services, and gun violence prevention. this session, i know there will be others that take action on these issues, and i applaud those efforts. the more resources we can bring to bear on this issue, the better. working together we can and will affect real change. there are some things we know already. we know that we must find ways to better respond to those with mental health needs. as a society, we have an obligation to take action in a meaningful way when a person seeks our help or demonstrates a need for it. we must balance our respect for individual rights with our obligation to provide for the greater public safety. and when it comes to preventing future acts of violence in our schools, let me say this
was an administrator in north carolina and was the national alliance of black school educators superintendent of the year. we have elizabeth celania-fagen -- liz fagen, douglas county superintendent of schools. she was superintendent of tucson unified. a beacon of education reform by arne duncan. david coleman, president of the college board. he co-founded student achievement partners. he was recognized as one of 11 education act of this. he was new school change agent of the year. he has set a high bar. always a mistake. john deasy, los angeles unified superintendent of schools, second largest system in the country. he was deputy director of education for the bill and melinda gates foundation. he is remembered as the hard- charging superintendent of the prince george's county schools. we have joanne weiss, chief of duncan. army duncane she ran the race to the top program, getting that off to a widely heralded start. ceo at the new schools venture fund. let's get this started. lost angeles is wrestling with a number of challenges. there are concerns about the reform. of where does it intersec
to this facility. we thought it would coincide with our efforts to get folks to recycle, it is a great educational tool. since then, we have had 95 professional artists come through. >> how has the program changed over the years? how has the program -- what can the public has an artist engage with? >> for the most part, we worked with metal and wood, what you would expect from a program like ours. over the years, we tried to include artists and all types of mediums. conceptual artists, at installation, photographers, videographers. >> that has really expanded the program out. it is becoming so dynamic right now with your vision of interesting artists in gauging here. why would an artist when to come here? >> mainly, access to the materials. we also give them a lot of support. when they start, it is an empty studio. they go out to the public area and -- we call it the big store. they go out shopping, take the materials that, and get to work. it is kind of like a reprieve, so they can really focus on their body of work. >> when you are talking about recology, do you have the only sculpture garden at
of our board of education, -- mendoza. with that, mr. mayor, would like to join us? (applause) >> i would like to give our mayor the opportunity to say a few words on today's occasion. >> thank you everybody. happy new year! i wanted to be here the congratulate the supervisors who have been reelected, as well as the new elected supervisors and to welcome those families and friends who have come along way i'm sure, whether working with the newly elected, or alongside all of us for many years. i want to acknowledge the public officials that have been identified in the commissioners and department heads, for being here today. a sincere congratulations to board president chiu for you nomination in your reelection as board president. i look forward to working with you and with the whole board to continue the success of our city and to make sure that the dialogue but we have just heard, whether the celebration that supervisor yee had last night or london had today - sorry, supervisor breed, we are all still calling ourselves each by our first names - we continue making sure that the
-election to the board of education. we look forward to working with you all. i am going to talk a little bit about restorative practices. the pac continues to receive requests to conduct community conversations regarding restorative practices from both school staff and our community partners. this morning the pac's restorative practices team will lead to many conversations. the first one will be with parent leaders from mission (inaudible) who are primarily spanish speaking and representatives in the school district. the second conversations will be with parent representatives from the second district parent teacher association. we recognize the importance of including our community partners in the implementation process of restorative practices. to leverage resources that are at the schools, and to bring restorative practices in schools across this district. thank you. >> hi, i have a son at john colonel, and i want to talk about community briefing. pac begins ongoing (inaudible) to bring ssfusd. to both inform community, parents, partners about district activities. second to bring more transpare
" magazine says maryland has the best public schhols in the nation. 3 but some education experts are questioning the raaking... 33 explain... whh ttey believe the magazine failed to ttke into account some iiportant -3 informatiin..- 3 no one is questioning maryland's financial 3&pstate legislature has routinell invested millions into programs, school buildings ann teaccer 3 bbddet cutsselsewhere.but how muchhdoessthe money matter... 3 struggling to read and - write???? 3 governor o'malley- is of course -celebrating the survey resuuts.. he visitee withhteachers nd studdnts t jones elementaay school todayy in severna park... here they posed for pictures wiih big foamie - fingers... indicating maryland's number one status. but experts at the "center - for education reform",,is - based in bethesda......say the 3 pmppovvegrades, grrduation rates, and close the achievement gaap for minority and low-income students.they saa maryland has foccsed too much on fundinn rather than reform. 3 < ""hat's not how you fix school, you fix schools by raisinn the
. >> in tonight's education alert, maryland schools continue their winning streak. they were named number one in the nation for the fifth year in our wrote. the system got a final grade of b-plus, but received no marks lower than a b. state school officials say there's still plenty of room for improvement. the top honor for a maryland scientist from the white house. >> he is one of 12 researchers been awarded this year's national medal of science. tim tooten is live in the newsroom with that story. big news for him, sam. >> he is a distinguished professor of physics, but his resume also includes a seat on the state board of education. the national medal of science from the white house is one of the highest honors given to scientists, engineers, and inventors. dr. gates is the author of more than 200 publications. he has been a member of the state school board since 2009. he says it is a nice surprise. >> the personal meaning i take from it is in order to get this sort of recognition, some of the world's best physicists had to support the research program i had been pursuing. that kind of affi
mentioned. perhaps better voter education about the tools that are out there to help them know where they need to vote, more staffing at the polling places where a captain or assistant captain could actually go through the front lines, the czech and lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone -- checkin lines to interface with the voters, say has anyone got any questions? i can check for you. that has become a real issue with all of the precincts. so come up voter education might be part of it, and i think early voting has law lot of voters into thinking "i can vote anywhere." and the only races they care about will be counted and in some cases the lower level races, they may be upset about. but it is like a shrug it for them and they say, oh, well. i think some of the lower races, some of the ballot initiatives, the more localized issues -- there might be a real problem in the end. so. >> thank you. i have a few things that have been touched on by almost everybody here. just to the voters, about being prepared. i know in arlington county, you can go on the web site. it tells
of the time. we need to do everything we've been doing with the economy, education, etc. we also need to address the plague and scourge of gun violence. we need to address hurricane sandy. so, yes, it is an aggressive agenda. it is a lot of work. but they elect us to lead, my friends. we will. they elect us to perform and we will. we have proven that we can lead. we have proven that we can perform. we know that with these challenges at hand that is exactly what we must now do. we have daunting challenges. no doubt. but these challenges also pose exciting opportunities. yes, it is hard to reform education. i know the politics of it. i know the problems, i know the issues. but, can you imagine how smart this state would be when we actually educate all our children to the best of the god given potential. when every black child and every white child and every urban child is educated to their full potential. i know helping the economy is hard. i know it has been decades of decline. can you imagine how successful our economy is going to be when that upstate economic engine is running at ful
and to be part of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from
is not done. the focus is on eliminating the achievement gap. every parent, educator, and child deserves to have the best school in his or her community. >> maryland received nothing lower than a b grade in a number of academics categories. how tough is it to remain number one? >> we're committed to making sure the children of maryland have the best education. can we say we will always be number one? of course not. but we will always strive to be number one. >> tim tooten, wbal-tv 11 news. >> tim love much more at 5:00 p.m. -- tim will have much more coming up at 5:00 p.m. >> and rock council has 45 new board-certified teachers -- and around the accounting now has 45 new board-certified teachers. >> it is the highest teaching credential in the nation that you can earn. >> the board acidification is valid for 10 years. >> schools is out for more than 1000 students across maryland. a trade school has shut down without warning. jennifer franciotti has more on that story. >> not even an e-mail. the students came to class yesterday not knowing their school would be shut down. there was a no
. it is as much of educational outreach and increase our interaction with our community 100 fold. this is the second season. this has brought us closer to our community. gerri: if you cannot grow a vegetable garden, i do you have any rights at all how to use your own property that you pay for? >> we pay taxes we have owned the land 20 years. it is our property. when they take our garden, what is next? >> asserts with food they slowly take away everything. it is not a hobby. gerri: it is not like it is marijuana. right? >> not surprising that a business show was the first national one to pick it up. it is about money we save thousands of dollars per year because of our healthy nutritious organic garden. it re-read to a garage restore it would cost a lot of money and we get that for free. gerri: somebody has to tend the garden. not totally free. [laughter] let us know what happens. says the city really go away? keep us in the loop with what is happening. we're interested. i believe in property rights and desperate to know what happens. jennifer and jason we appreciate it. what do y
of education executive order. roosevelt interned japanese americans. so, there's a lot of -- reagan by the way, banned abortions in military hospitals. executive order. so a lot of big policies have started out as executive orders, but overruling the second amendment, it's a tough concept. >> he can't say i ban -- do a new assault weapons ban or something like that? >> he can't do that. he has power of the executive branch. and he can, i can come up with ways that he can do it. he could ban the military from participating in sporting events with the nra where these assault rifles are used. he could ban funding of certain programs. there are ways he can work around the edges of gun control, but i cannot see how he would ban weapons outright. >> first of all, reality check. an executive order cannot supersede the constitution. so everyone just chill out. we have a lot of record as paul just said, of executive orders being done -- w. had 291 executive orders. again, reality check. in terms of what the president could do, in some ways, it's consistent with what the nra calls for. three things the
. >> you bridge up a good -- bring up a good point this is not school save the or education this is about one thing, money for the school. so we're dealing with funding issues. >> that is education. >> if they wear the badges, they will increase attendance levels and therefore increase funding. >> that increases education value for students. >> you can't say that money does not equate education. neil: you say, that is not the issue? >> it is a financial incentive, but what is bothering me, at the end of the day, money equates to more school population, books, education equals funding, better teachers, higher paid salary toss say this is irrelevant, and a different issue, no. >> i didn't say irrelevant. i think it is a slippery slope. here is the thing money is more important than religion. >> it is important. the school is not in the wrong, they said okay we'll give that you exception the and family said no, that is not enough. >> correct because -- >> she is not going to drive she does not want a driver's license. >> taking the function out of the badge, it changed the fact -- >> it is w
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 224 (some duplicates have been removed)